Free Online Business & Economics Courses

Knowledge is power, said Francis Bacon. This is especially true in the world of business, and if you want to get ahead of the game, these online courses would be a good place to start. You'll find classes here from some of the most prestigious colleges in the country, such as MIT and UC Berkeley. And as a business student, you'll of course appreciate the value of getting such high-end instruction for free.

Academic Strategies for the Business Professional - Kaplan

Welcome to Academic Strategies for the Business Professional. This course introduces you to the purposes and processes of university education. An emphasis is placed on study, communication, and thinking skills that support academic achievement. Students also examine the relationship between learning and motivation.

Academic Strategies for the IT Professional - Kaplan

In this course, you will plan, organize, and prioritize your school-related activities by assessing your time management skills and setting goals. You will understand what causes stress, how time and stress management are connected and what you can do to manage stress effectively. You will identify your learning styles and learn how to be a more effective writer.

Advanced Contract Theory - MIT

This course focuses on recent developments in contract theory. Topics include: advanced models of moral hazard, adverse selection, mechanism design and incomplete contracts with applications to theory of the firm, organizational design, and financial structure.

Advanced Macroeconomics II - MIT

The course is intended to introduce the students, not only to particular areas of current research, but also to some very useful analytical tools. It covers a selection of topics that varies from year to year. Recent topics include: Growth and Fluctuations, Heterogeneity and Incomplete Markets, Optimal Fiscal Policy, Time Inconsistency, Reputation, Coordination Games and Macroeconomic Complementarities, and Information

Advanced Stochastic Processes - MIT

The class covers the analysis and modeling of stochastic processes. Topics include measure theoretic probability, martingales, filtration, and stopping theorems, elements of large deviations theory, Brownian motion and reflected Brownian motion, stochastic integration and Ito calculus and functional limit theorems. In addition, the class will go over some applications to finance theory, insurance, queueing and inventory models.

Advanced Strategy - MIT

This course draws on a wide range of perspectives to explore the roots of long term competitive advantage in unusually successful firms. Using a combination of cases, simulations, readings and, most importantly, lively discussion, the course will explore the ways in which long term advantage is built from first mover advantage, increasing returns, and unique organizational competencies. We will focus particularly on the ways in which the actions of senior management build competitive advantage over time, and on the strategic implications of understanding the roots of a firm's success.

Advanced Topics in Real Estate Finance - MIT

This half-semester course introduces and surveys a selection of cutting-edge topics in the field of real estate finance and investments. The course follows an informal "seminar" format to the maximum degree possible, with students expected to take considerable initiative. Lectures and discussions led by the instructors will be supplemented by several guest speakers from the real estate investment industry, who will present perspectives on current trends and important developments in the industry.

An Introduction to Business Culture - The Open University

Disney and Google are just two companies renowned for their ‘business culture’. Have you ever wondered why the company you work for is different from others? This unit explores how the concept of culture developed to the point where it is now ...

Applications of System Dynamics - MIT

This course is a project-based course that explores how organizations can use system dynamics to achieve important goals. In small groups, students learn modeling and consulting skills by working on a term-long project with real-life managers. A diverse set of businesses and organizations sponsor class projects, from start-ups to the Fortune 500. The course focuses on gaining practical insight from the system dynamics process, and appeals to people interested in system dynamics, consulting, or managerial policy-making.

Applied Economics for Managers - MIT

The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency.

Applied Macro and International Economics - MIT

This course focuses on using case studies to investigate the macroenvironment in which firms operate. The course is divided in five parts: Basic tools of macroeconomic management; Evaluation of different economic development strategies; Crises in emerging markets: causes, solutions, and prevention; Problems faced by transition economies; and Challenges of developed countries.

Architecture and Communication in Organizations - MIT

While no businesses succeed based on their architecture or space design, many fail as a result of inattention to the power of spatial relationships. This course demonstrates through live case studies with managers and architects the value of strategic space planning and decision making in relation to business needs. The course presents conceptual frameworks for thinking about architecture, communication and organizations.

Assessing Commercial Risk - MSU Global

Research and analyze credit history and payment capacity of potential buyers/partners to assess the commercial risk of a buyer and maintain credit management and control procedures and documentation.

Introduction to Strategic Management - Capilano College

This is an integration course of all previous Business Management courses. We will focus on the methods of strategic management and business analyses that utilise the entire cross section of skills that have been developed in the previous terms of study.

Behavorial Economics and Finance - MIT

This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process.

Introduction to Business - Kaplan

The BU100 Introduction to Business course provides a fundamental working knowledge of the varied aspects of business and prepares you for future studies in more specialized topics within the subject area. You will increase your awareness of the overall environment and function of business as well as observe its contributions to society. This course also covers communication technology, globalization, and business ethics.

Building and Leading Effective Teams - MIT

This course is an intensive one-week introduction to leadership, teams, and learning communities. The class meets daily for five days. The class serves as an introduction of concepts and uses a variety of experiential exercises to develop individual and team skills, as well as supportive relationships within the Leaders for Manufacturing class. As part of the focus on leadership, it discusses the idea of the "Universe Within", the images, thoughts, and experiences that are internal to all leaders.

Building Relationships with Donors - The Open University

Legacy fundraising, big-gift seeking are all part of the professional fundraiser's role. This unit will help you to gain the skills necessary to persuade individuals to become donors. How do you change people's ideas about methods of giving….

Business Analysis Using Financial Statements - MIT

The purpose of this class is to advance your understanding of how to use financial information to value and analyze firms. We will apply your economics/accounting/finance skills to problems from today's business news to help us understand what is contained in financial reports, why firms report certain information, and how to be a sophisticated user of this information.

Business Organizations and Their Environment - The Open University

We know that culture guides the way people behave in society as a whole. But culture also plays a key role in organisations, which have their own unique set of values, beliefs and ways of doing business. This unit explores the concepts of national and organisational culture and the factors that influence both

Campaigns and Organizations - The Open University

If you've ever been involved in campaigning for change, you probably know that getting the desired result is much harder than it seems. Moreover, the decision to campaign on a particular issue can expose tensions and cracks within an organisation itself. This unit explores effective approaches to campaigning.

Capital Markets - University of California

An overview of the investment markets, this course examines the menu of securities available in today's market and the attributes of the various types of securities. It will also examine the purpose of capital markets, capitalization structure, how domestic and global securities markets work, the trend toward globalization of the capital markets, the organized exchanges for stocks and bonds and securities trading, the mechanics of the buy-side/ sell-side, the role of investment bankers and brokers, derivatives, and other related topics.

Capatalism and its Critics - MIT

This course examines the implications of economic theories for social and political organization in the context of the historical evolution of industrial societies. Among the authors whose theories will be discussed are Ayn Rand, Milton Friedman, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Joseph Schumpeter, and John Kenneth Galbraith. Emphasis will be placed on class discussion of specific texts.

Choosing a Human Resource Consultant - The Open University

Human resources consultancies have become invaluable to businesses looking for improvements and efficiencies in their operations. This unit explores the issues surrounding how you might go about selecting and using a consultant, examining the risks involved in the venture, fitting the consultant to the task, setting fees and evaluating work. If you are in business and looking to hire a consultant, are a consultant yourself or are studying business at masters level this unit will be useful to you.

Collective Choice I - MIT

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Communicating with Data - MIT

Communicating With Data has a distinctive structure and content, combining fundamental quantitative techniques of using data to make informed management decisions with illustrations of how real decision makers, even highly trained professionals, fall prey to errors and biases in their understanding. We present the fundamental concepts underlying the quantitative techniques as a way of thinking, not just a way of calculating, in order to enhance decision-making skills.

Communication for Managers - MIT

Writing and speaking skills necessary for a career in management. Students polish communication strategies and methods through discussion, examples, and practice. Several written and oral assignments, most based on material from other subjects and from career development activities. Schedule and curriculum coordinated with 15.311 Organizational Processes class. Restricted to first-year Sloan School of Management graduate students.

Communication Skills for Academics - MIT

Your success as an academic will depend heavily on your ability to communicate to fellow researchers in your discipline, to colleagues in your department and university, to undergraduate and graduate students, and perhaps even to the public at large. Communicating well in an academic setting depends not only on following the basic rules that govern all good communication (for example, tailoring the message to meet the needs of a specific audience), but also on adhering to the particular norms of academic genres.

Competition in Telecommunication - MIT

Competition in Telecommunications provides an introduction to the economics, business strategies, and technology of telecommunications markets. This includes markets for wireless communications, local and long-distance services, and customer equipment. The convergence of computers, cable TV and telecommunications and the competitive emergence of the Internet are covered in depth. A number of speakers from leading companies in the industry will give course lectures.

Competitive Decision Making and Negotiation - MIT

This course is centered on twelve negotiation exercises that simulate competitive business situations. Specific topics covered include distributive bargaining (split the pie!), mixed motive bargaining (several issues at stake) with two and with more than two parties, auctions and fair division. Ethical dilemmas in negotiation are discussed at various times throughout the course. There are two principal objectives for this course. The first is to provide you with negotiation tools that enable you to achieve your negotiation objectives in a fair and responsible fashion. The second is to "learn by doing."

Corporate Entrepreneurship: Strategies for Technology Based New Business Development - MIT

This course is about "corporate entrepreneurship", my label for the alternative approaches that existing firms use to generate new technology-based products and businesses. It emphasizes various kinds of internal ventures and multiple "external" collaborative approaches that include corporate venture capital investments, licensing and different types of alliances and formal joint ventures. Basis for the new knowledge presented in this course is a combination of academic research and my personal experience supplemented by that of the several guest lecturers.

Completing the Project - The Open University

This unit will examine the particular issues that arise in bringing a project to a close, and ways of evaluating a project on its completion. The key components of project closure will be identified and discussed and their importance in ensuring that the aims and objectives of a project have been successfully attained will be explored. After studying this unit, you will be able to plan an effective project closure.

Creating an Ethical Organization - The Open University

Businesses are increasingly making explicit their committment to dealing with ethical concerns. This unit explores the business case for an ethical approach to human resources management and examines whether a more 'human-centred' approach can bring dividends, and how an ethical approach fits within an organisation's strategy.

Cross Cultural Leadership - MIT

Cross Cultural Leadership is a collaborative research seminar that examines what constitutes "effective" leadership across cultures. It is collaborative because the students are expected to provide some of the content. The weekly readings target particular aspects of cultural differentiation. Working within those topics, students are asked to describe aspects of leadership in particular cultures based on their research and/or personal experiences. The goal of the course is to help prepare students for business assignments outside of their native countries.

Data Mining - MIT

This course will examine methods that have emerged from both fields and proven to be of value in recognizing patterns and making predictions from an applications perspective. We will survey applications and provide an opportunity for hands-on experimentation with algorithms for data mining using easy-to- use software and cases.

Data, Models and Decisions - MIT

This course is designed to introduce first-year MBA students to the fundamental quantitative techniques of using data to make informed management decisions. In particular, the course focuses on various ways of modeling, or thinking structurally about, decision problems in order to enhance decision-making skills. Topics include decision analysis, probability, random variables, statistical estimation, regression, simulation, linear optimization, as well as nonlinear and discrete optimization. Management cases are used extensively to illustrate the practical use of modeling tools to improve the management practice.

Designing and Leading entrepreneurial organization - MIT

This subject is about building, running, and growing an organization. Subject has four central themes: How to think analytically about designing organizational systems; How leaders, especially founders, play a critical role in shaping an organization's culture; What really needs to be done to build a successful organization for the long-term and What one can do to improve the likelihood of personal success.

Developing a Financial Plan - MSU Global

Develop a financial plan to establish whether internal/external international trade financing is required..

Developmental Entrepreneurialship - MIT

This class surveys developmental entrepreneurship via case examples of both successful and failed businesses and generally grapples with deploying and diffusing products and services through entrepreneurial action. By drawing on live and historical cases, especially from South Asia, Africa, Latin America as well as Eastern Europe, China, and other developing regions, we seek to cover the broad spectrum of challenges and opportunities facing developmental entrepreneurs.

Digital Anthropology - MIT

Digital Anthropology is a Spring 2003 applied social science and media arts seminar, surveying the blossoming arena of digital-artifact enabled experimental sociology/anthropology. We will emphasize on both (a) Technology Testbeds – systematically deploying research lab prototypes and corporate pre-production products in a sample human organizational population and carefully observing the social consequences, and (b) Sociometrics – using digital artifacts to better observe and measure the complex social reality of interesting human systems.

Doctoral Seminar in Research Methods I - MIT

This course is designed to lay the foundations of good empirical research in the social sciences. It does not deal with specific techniques per se, but rather with the assumptions and the logic underlying social research. Students become acquainted with a variety of approaches to research design, and are helped to develop their own research projects and to evaluate the products of empirical research..

Doctoral Seminar in Research Methods II - MIT

A large proportion of contemporary research on organizations, strategy and management relies on quantitative research methods. This course is designed to provide an introduction to some of the most commonly used quantitative techniques, including logit/probit models, count models, event history models, and pooled cross-section techniques.

Dynamic Leadership: Using Improvisation in Business - MIT

The first two weeks of this course are an overview of performing improvisation with introductory and advanced exercises in the techniques of improvisation. The final four weeks focus on applying these concepts in business situations to practice and mastering these improvisation tools in leadership learning.

Dynamic Optimization & Economic Applications (Recursive Methods) - MIT

The unifying theme of this course is best captured by the title of our main reference book: "Recursive Methods in Economic Dynamics". We start by covering deterministic and stochastic dynamic optimization using dynamic programming analysis. We then study the properties of the resulting dynamic systems. Finally, we will go over a recursive method for repeated games that has proven useful in contract theory and macroeconomics. We shall stress applications and examples of all these techniques throughout the course.

Introduction to Microeconomics - Utah State

This course is designed to help you build an understanding of the economics of the market place. In particular we focus on microeconomic principles that demonstrate the role and limitations of both competitive and imperfectly competitive markets in motivating socially efficient consumer, business, and public sector choices.

International Economics - Utah State

This course provides a broad overview of international trade theory, policy, and international finance. Students who master this material will be better able to work in and make contributions to organizations (e.g., business firms) involved in international trade and finance issues.

Managerial Economics - Utah State

This course covers the essential principles and tools of Managerial Economics, the application of microeconomics to management decisions. Students who master this material will be better prepared for leadership positions in business, not-for-profit, and government entities..

Microeconomics for Managers - Utah State

This course provides a broad overview of macroeconomic theory and policy. The focus is on understanding fluctuations in the levels of income, employment, and production and policy responses to these fluctuations.

Econometrics - MIT

Introduction to econometric models and techniques, simultaneous equations, program evaluation, emphasizing regression. Advanced topics include instrumental variables, panel data methods, measurement error, and limited dependent variable models. May not count toward HASS requirement..

Econometrics I - MIT

This course focuses on the specification and estimation of the linear regression model. The course departs from the standard Gauss-Markov assumptions to include heteroskedasticity, serial correlation, and errors in variables. Advanced topics include generalized least squares, instrumental variables, nonlinear regression, and limited dependent variable models. Economic applications are discussed throughout the course.

Economic Analysis for Business Decisions - MIT

Our objective is to give you a working knowledge of the analytical tools that bear most directly on the economic decisions firms must regularly make. We will emphasize market structure and industrial performance, including the strategic interaction of firms. We will examine the behavior of individual markets -- and the producers and consumers that sell and buy in those markets -- in some detail, focusing on cost analysis, the determinants of market demand, pricing strategy, market power, and the implications of government regulatory policies.

Economic Applications of Game Theory - MIT

Game Theory has emerged as a branch of mathematics and is still quite mathematical. Our emphasis will be on the conceptual analysis, keeping the level of math to a minimum, especially at a level that should be quite acceptable to the average MIT student. Yet bear in mind that this still implies that you should be at ease with basic probability theory and calculus, and more importantly, you should be used to thinking in mathematical terms. Intermediate Microeconomics is also a prerequisite (simultaneous attendance to one of the intermediate courses is also acceptable).

Economic History - MIT

This course is a survey of world economic history, and it introduces economics students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. It is designed to expand the range of empirical settings in students' research by drawing upon historical material and long-run data. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. The emphasis will be on questions related to labor markets and economic growth.

Economic Institutions and Growth Policy Analysis - MIT

This course is designed for students particularly concerned with the practical problems of operating in large formal organizations, either from an operational or a research perspective. It will focus, as the title suggests, upon different forms of economic organizations and institutions in advanced and developing industrial societies and the theories (and theoretical perspectives) which might help us to understand them..

Economics and eCommerce - MIT

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries.

Economics of Education - MIT

This class discusses the economic aspects of current issues in education, using both economic theory and econometric and institutional readings. Topics include discussion of basic human capital theory, the growing impact of education on earnings and earnings inequality, statistical issues in determining the true rate of return to education, the labor market for teachers, implications of the impact of computers on the demand for worker skills, the effectiveness of mid-career training for adult workers, the roles of school choice, charter schools, state standards and educational technology in improving K-12 education, and the issue of college financial aid.

Economics Research and Communication - MIT

This course is for students interested in conducting original research on economics questions. There will be an emphasis on choice of research topics, primary sources, data sources, and research methods. The primary activities are oral presentations, the preparation of a paper, and providing constructive feedback on classmates' research projects.

Economy and Business in Modern China and India - MIT

The purpose of this course is to analyze these two countries within a coherent analytical framework. Our learning model is inductive, and heavily based on class discussions and participation. The group projects should aim at integrating analysis, knowledge and understanding of these two countries. We will also experiment with other forms of group projects, such as creating and working on business plans and those projects that integrate research from field trips with more traditional research, such as library research..

Effective Ways of Displaying Information - The Open University

The power of graphics should not the underestimated. They can express information clearly and simply. This unit will help you to assess which style of graphic to use in different situations..

Energy Economics - MIT

This course explores the theoretical and empirical perspectives on individual and industrial demand for energy, energy supply, energy markets, and public policies affecting energy markets. It discusses aspects of the oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear power sectors and examines energy tax, price regulation, deregulation, energy efficiency and policies for controlling emission.

Entrepreneurial Marketing - MIT

This course clarifies key marketing concepts, methods, and strategic issues relevant for start-up and early-stage entrepreneurs.

Environmental Economics and Government Responses to Market Failure - MIT

This course explores the theory behind and evidence on regulatory, tax, and other government responses to problems of market failure. Special emphasis is given to developing and implementing tools to evaluate environmental policies. Other topics include cost-benefit analysis, measurement of the benefits of non-market goods and costs of regulations, and the evaluation of the impact of regulations in areas such as financial markets, workplace health and safety, consumer product safety, and other contexts.

Environmental Factors and Organizations - The Open University

The interactions of business with the non-commercial environment are under increasing scrutiny. This unit looks at the relationships between business and social and ecological environments, often referred to under the umbrella term of Corporate Social Responsibility. The unit examines efforts to reconcile what often look to be competing demands by moving towards a more ethical environment..

Equity Finance - The Open University

Private equity, venture capital, stock exchange listing: all are methods of raising equity finance. This unit looks at the processes used and the markets available across the world for raising such finance, as well as looking into the reasons why some companies choose cross-listing on stock exchanges.

Epidemiological Thinking for Non Specialists - MIT

Introduction to methods and problems in research and applications where quantitative data is analyzed to reconstruct possible pathways of development of behaviors and diseases. Special attention given to social inequalities, changes over the life course, heterogeneous pathways, and controversies with implications for policy and practice. Case studies and course projects are shaped to accommodate students with interests in fields related to health, gerontology, education, psychology, sociology, and public policy.

Finance Theory II - MIT

The objective of this course is to learn the financial tools needed to make good business decisions. The course presents the basic insights of corporate finance theory, but emphasizes the application of theory to real business decisions. Each session involves class discussion, some centered on lectures and others around business cases.

Financial Accounting - MIT

This six-week summer course teaches basic concepts of corporate financial accounting and reporting. This information is widely used in making investment decisions, corporate and managerial performance assessment, and valuation of firms. Students perform economics-based analysis of accounting information from the viewpoint of the users of accounting information (especially senior managers) rather than the preparer (the accountant). This course is restricted to MIT Sloan Fellows in Innovation and Global Leadership.

Financial and Managerial Accounting - MIT

This course is an intensive introduction to the preparation and interpretation of financial information for investors (external users) and managers (internal users) and to the use of financial instruments to support system and project creation. The course adopts a decision-maker perspective on accounting and finance with the goal of helping students develop a framework for understanding financial, managerial, and tax reports. 15.514 is restricted to System Design and Management students.

Financial Management - MIT

Financial Management studies corporate finance and capital markets, emphasizing the financial aspects of managerial decisions. It touches on all areas of finance, including the valuation of real and financial assets, risk management and financial derivatives, the trade-off between risk and expected return, and corporate financing and dividend policy. The course draws heavily on empirical research to help guide managerial decisions.

Financial Markets - Yale

Financial institutions are a pillar of civilized society, supporting people in their productive ventures and managing the economic risks they take on. The workings of these institutions are important to comprehend if we are to predict their actions today and their evolution in the coming information age. The course strives to offer understanding of the theory of finance and its relation to the history, strengths and imperfections of such institutions as banking, insurance, securities, futures, and other derivatives markets, and the future of these institutions over the next century.

Fundamentos de Análisis de Negócios - University of California

Este curso oferece entendimento básico das funções do analista de negócios e do impacto destas funções nos negócios para as pessoas que ainda não têm muita intimidade com a análise ou supervisão de negócios. O curso foca especialmente as funções de análise de negócios no que tange ao desenvolvimento de soluções de TI e o ciclo de vida dos projetos de análise de negócios. Alguns itens do curso: papel do analista de negócios, requisitos de coleta e documentação do usuário, modelo de negócios, análise de caso de negócios, modelo de processo, gerenciamento de qualidade e testagem.

Fundamentals of Business Analysis - University of California

This course is designed to give people new to the business analyst role or those who supervise business analysts a basic understanding of the functions and business impact of this role. The course provides a special focus on business analysis functions as they relate to the development of information technology solutions and the business analysis project life cycle. Course topics include the role of the business analyst, gathering and documenting user requirements, modeling the business, business case analysis, process modeling, quality management and testing..

Fundamentals of Personal Financial Planning - University of California

The course was created to help those who cannot afford extensive planning assistance better understand how to define and reach their financial goals. It provides basic understanding so informed decisions can be made. The course can also be seen as a reference for individual topics that are part of personal financial planning.

Game Theory - Yale

This course is an introduction to game theory and strategic thinking. Ideas such as dominance, backward induction, Nash equilibrium, evolutionary stability, commitment, credibility, asymmetric information, adverse selection, and signaling are discussed and applied to games played in class and to examples drawn from economics, politics, the movies, and elsewhere.

Game Theory for Managers - MIT

This half-term course examines the choices that we make which affect others and the choices others make that affect us. Managers frequently play "games" both within the firm and outside it – with competitors, customers, regulators, and even capital markets! The goal of this course is to enhance a student's ability to think strategically in complex, interactive environments. Knowledge of game theory will give students an advantage in such strategic settings. The course is structured around three "themes for acquiring advantage in games": commitment / strategic moves, exploiting hidden information, and limited rationality.

Global Climate Change: Economics Science and Policy - MIT

This class introduces scientific, economic, and ecological issues underlying the threat of global climate change, and the institutions engaged in negotiating an international response. It also develops an integrated approach to analysis of climate change processes, and assessment of proposed policy measures, drawing on research and model development within the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change..

Global Markets National Policies and the Competitive Advantages of Firms - MIT

The world is changing in two fundamental ways. First, the development of a truly global market in products, services, capital, and even certain types of labor is changing the basic terms of competition for an array of different firms and industries. Second, the rules and institutions governing the new international economic order are still in flux. National regulations are no longer adequate yet international accords over trade, intellectual property, labor standards, and a host of other issues are fiercely and frequently contested by competing interests.

Global Strategy and Organization - MIT

The goal of this subject is to provide the foundations for taking effective action in the multi-layered world of international business. The first section of the course provides frameworks for identifying and taking advantage of the opportunities presented in a dynamic global environment at the level of the country and industry. The second section of the course focuses on firm-level strategic choices regarding where to engage in which activities. The third section focuses on the challenges of integrating the multiple perspectives, functions, and interests that constitute the multinational firm.

Government Regulation of Industry - MIT

The objective of this course is to introduce you to the role of government in markets where competitive equilibria “fail.” In this course we will emphasize the importance of market structure and industrial performance, including the strategic interaction of firms. We will examine the behavior of individual markets in some detail, focusing on cost analysis, the determinants of market demand, investment behavior, market power, and the implications of government regulatory behavior.

How to Develop Breakthrough Products and Services - MIT

To prosper, firms must develop major product and service innovations. Often, though, they don't know how. Recent research into the innovation process has made it possible to develop "breakthroughs" systematically. 15.356 presents several practical concept development methods, such as the "Lead User Method," where manufacturers learn from innovative customers. Expert guest speakers present case studies that show the "art" required to implement a concept development method. 15.356 is a half-term subject.

Implementing the Project - The Open University

Day-to-day monitoring of a project is essential to ensure that work is progressing according to the plan, and it will often be necessary to review and revise the plan as circumstances change. This unit will introduce some of the key techniques that help managers to monitor and control projects, and consider what approaches work best in particular circumstances.

Individuals, Groups and Organizations - MIT

This class develops basic concepts for understanding individual, group, and organizational behavior through the critical analysis of important works in the field. Among the areas covered are: individual affect and cognition; group process and performance; and organizational culture and adaptation. The class also emphasizes the use of behavioral science concepts for stimulating new and useful organizational behavior research.

Industrial Organization and Public Policy - MIT

This is a course in industrial organization, the study of firms in markets. Industrial organization focuses on firm behavior in imperfectly competitive markets, which appear to be far more common than the perfectly competitive markets that were the focus of your basic microeconomics course. This field analyzes the acquisition and use of market power by firms, strategic interactions among firms, and the role of government competition policy. We will approach this subject from both theoretical and applied perspectives.

Industrial Organization I - MIT

The course provides a graduate level introduction to Industrial Organization. It is designed to provide a broad introduction to topics and industries that current researchers are studying as well as to expose students to a wide variety of techniques. The course integrates theoretical models and empirical studies.

Information Technology and the Labor Market - MIT

This course explores how information technology is reshaping different dimensions of the U.S. labor market: the way work is organized, the mix of occupations, the skills required to perform in an occupation, economy-wide labor productivity, and the distribution of wages.

Information Technology as an Integrating Force in Manufacturing - MIT

In virtually every industry and every firm, information technology is driving change, creating opportunities and challenges. Leaders who don't understand at least the fundamentals of information systems will be at a strategic disadvantage. This course provides broad coverage of technology concepts and trends underlying current and future developments in information technology, and fundamental principles for the effective use of computer-based information systems. There will be a special emphasis on manufacturing.

Information Technology Essentials - MIT

This class offers a broad coverage of technology concepts and trends underlying current and future developments in information technology, and fundamental principles for the effective use of computer-based information systems. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing, including the World Wide Web. Other topics include: hardware and operating systems, software development tools and processes, relational databases, security and cryptography, enterprise applications, and electronic commerce. Hands-on exposure to Web, database, and graphical user interface (GUI) tools.

Innovative Businesses and Breakthrough Technologies: The Legal Issues - MIT

This course is an introduction to business law which covers the fundamentals, including contracts, liability, regulation, employment, and corporations, with an in-depth treatment of the legal issues relating to breakthrough technologies, including the legal framework of R&D, the commercialization of new high-technology products in start-ups and mature companies, and the liability and regulatory implications of new products and innovative business models. There is extensive attention to national and international intellectual property protection and strategies.

Integrating eSystems Global Information Systems - MIT

The strategic importance of information technology is now widely accepted. It has also become increasingly clear that the identification of strategic applications alone does not result in success for an organization. A careful coordination of strategic applications, information technologies, and organizational structures must be made to attain success. This course addresses strategic, technological, and organizational connectivity issues to support effective and meaningful integration of information and systems. This course is especially relevant to those who wish to effectively exploit information technology and create new business processes and opportunities.

Intermediate Applied Macroeconomics - MIT

This subject considers three topics of macroeconomics that are alive and controversial for policy today. The topics are: economic growth - the roles of capital accumulation, increased education, and technological progress in determining economic growth; savings - the effect of government and private debt on economic growth; and exchange-rate regimes - their role in the Great Depression and today.

Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory - MIT

This course is a survey of modern macroeconomics at a quite advanced level. Topics include the neoclassical growth model, overlapping generations, endogenous growth models, business cycles, incomplete nominal adjustment, incomplete financial markets, fiscal and monetary policy, consumption and savings, and unemployment. The course is also an introduction to the mathematical tools used in modern macroeconomics, including dynamic systems, optimal control, and dynamic programming.

International Economics - Utah State

This course provides a broad overview of international trade theory, policy, and international finance. Students who master this material will be better able to work in and make contributions to organizations (e.g., business firms) involved in international trade and finance issues.

Tufts University - MIT

The weekly in-class discussions in this seminar allow for in-depth examination of international politics topics in the context of case studies. Samples of student work are in the Assignments section. A particularly unique feature of the seminar is the Simulation Exercise Seminar, an all-day international environmental negotiation role-play exercise..

International Trade - MIT

This course is an introduction to the theory of international trade and finance with applications to current policy issues. In this course we will cover the basic tools to understand what determines the flow of goods across countries, i.e. international trade, and what determines the flow of savings and investments from one country to another, i.e. international finance. We will also cover applications to a number of topics of current interest, including the debate on globalization, free trade agreements, the U.S. current account deficit, the medium run prospects for exchange rates, European integration, and the debate on global financial architecture following the financial crises in East Asia and Argentina.

Introduction to Business - Kaplan

The BU100 Introduction to Business course provides a fundamental working knowledge of the varied aspects of business and prepares you for future studies in more specialized topics within the subject area. You will increase your awareness of the overall environment and function of business as well as observe its contributions to society. This course also covers communication technology, globalization, and business ethics.

Introduction to Microeconomics - Utah State

This course is designed to help you build an understanding of the economics of the market place. In particular we focus on microeconomic principles that demonstrate the role and limitations of both competitive and imperfectly competitive markets in motivating socially efficient consumer, business, and public sector choices..

Introduction to Financial and Managerial Accounting - MIT

This course studies basic concepts of financial and managerial reporting. The viewpoint is that of readers of financial and managerial reports rather than the accountants who prepare them.

Introduction to Operations Management - MIT

This half-term course introduces students to problems and analysis related to the design, planning, control, and improvement of manufacturing and service operations. Class sessions involve explaining concepts, working examples, and discussing cases. A wide range of topics are covered, including: process analysis, quality management, supply chain design, procurement, and product development. Toward the end of the course, students work in teams to manage a virtual factory in a web-based simulation exercise.

Introduction to Statistical Method in Economics - MIT

This course is a self-contained introduction to statistics with economic applications. Elements of probability theory, sampling theory, statistical estimation, regression analysis, and hypothesis testing. It uses elementary econometrics and other applications of statistical tools to economic data. It also provides a solid foundation in probability and statistics for economists and other social scientists. We will emphasize topics needed in the further study of econometrics and provide basic preparation for 14.32. No prior preparation in probability and statistics is required, but familiarity with basic algebra and calculus is assumed.

Introduction to Project Management - University of California

This module is the introduction to the University Extension online course, Introduction to Project Management. Project management has been proven to be the most effective method of delivering products within cost, schedule, and resource constraints. This intensive and hands-on course gives you the skills to ensure your projects are completed on time and on budget while giving the user the product they expect. You will gain a strong working knowledge of the basics of project management and be able to immediately use that knowledge to effectively manage work projects.

Introduction to Tourism - University of Southern Queensland

This course covers topics which include defining what tourism is and the tourism system. It then reviews the development of tourism and tourist destinations before embarking on examining the tourist product and tourist industry. Where would tourism be without marketing? The course then explores market segmentation and then discusses the economic, socio-cultural and environmental impacts which must be considered when planning for tourism and the future of tourism.

Investment Risk - The Open University

Risk, in a financial context, is a synonym for uncertainty. This unit will allow those with some background knowledge of the area to explore investment risk. You will examine how and why investors are risk-averse and look at the risk factors involved in making a decision to invest.

Investments - MIT

This course teaches how to make sound investment decisions through in-depth knowledge of the financial markets, rigorous analytical thinking and precise mathematical derivation. Included is a comprehensive set of lecture notes for all 23 lectures to explain core concepts. Also, students gain hands-on experience with optimization, data analysis, and other quantitative techniques by completing the five group assignments.

IT and Business Transformation - MIT

The purpose of this Proseminar in Information Technology and Business Transformation (ITBT) is to provide students with a view of IT-enabled transformation and the strategic issues in the management of IT. The seminar will bring in CIOs, CEOs, and experienced consultants and industry observers to provide their perspectives and tell their stories about the use and management of IT today. Their talks will deal with the new technology, the new applications, the issues of implementation, the changes in industries and companies, and the strategic management of IT.

Knowledge Technologies in Context - The Open University

This unit explores knowledge technologies, that is, software systems that can represent, interpret, formalise or interrogate phenomena and create models of how the world works. It demonstrates how a well designed system can have positive effects on the work ‘ecosystem’, potentially allowing more time for people to concentrate on their strengths. Emphasising core concepts of representation, interpretation and situated use in context, this unit will help masters students and those involved in specifying and designing software for business understand how such systems can help manage knowledge.

Labor Economics II - MIT

This is the second of a two-part sequence of courses in labor economics. The course sequence is also open to qualified students in related fields and classes may be taken individually or out of sequence. This part of the sequence is principally concerned with issues relating to the determinants of the wage and salary distribution.

Law for the Entrepreneur and Manager - MIT

This course provides a basic understanding of legal issues that corporations face during their existence. The course starts by providing the basic building blocks of business law. We then follow a firm through its life cycle from its "breakaway" from an established firm through it going public.

Leadership Lab - MIT

This five-day interactive and experiential workshop focuses on how leaders lead innovations that both promote social responsibility and produce business success. The workshop is organized around three main parts: observation, sense-making, and creating.

Leadership Tools and Teams - MIT

In this class you will be creating a leadership development tool for students like yourselves in the leadership program at Sloan. This tool might be a coaching guide for second-year pilots, a leadership workbook for MBA students to use during their summer employment, a leadership assessment for club presidents or a workshop on networking. You will be free to choose the tool that you want to develop, but by the end of the class there must be a product that can be used at Sloan. In addition, the tools must link in some way to the leadership model used at Sloan.

Leadership Organizations II - MIT

Through lectures, discussions, and class exercises, 15.322 analyzes the human processes underlying organizational behavior and change. The class makes students aware of the challenge of organizational change and equips them to better handle it. There are many psychological and sociological phenomena that regularly occur in organizations, though many of these forces are difficult to see. The aim is to increase the students' understanding of these forces – in themselves and in others – so they become more visible and manageable. The prerequisite for this course is 15.321, Leading Organizations I.

Listening to the Customer - MIT

Marketing research may be divided into methods that emphasize understanding "the customer" and methods that emphasize understanding "the market." This course (15.821) deals with the customer and emphasizes qualitative methods (interviews, focus groups, Voice of the Customer, composing questions for a survey). The companion course (15.822) deals with the market and emphasizes quantitative methods (sampling, survey execution, quantitative data interpretation, conjoint analysis, factor analysis).

Literature Ethics and Authority - MIT

Our subject is the ethics of leadership, an examination of the principles appealed to by executive authority when questions arise about its sources and its legitimacy. Most treatments of this subject resort to case-studies in order to illustrate the application of ethical principles to business situations, but our primary emphasis will be upon classic works of imaginative literature, which convey more directly than case-studies the ethical pressures of decision-making. Readings will include works by Shakespeare, Sophocles, Shaw, E.M. Forster, Joseph Conrad, George Orwell, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, and Henrik Ibsen, among others.

Logistical and Transformation Planning Methods - MIT

The class will cover quantitative techniques of Operations Research with emphasis on applications in transportation systems analysis (urban, air, ocean, highway, pick-up and delivery systems) and in the planning and design of logistically oriented urban service systems (e.g., fire and police departments, emergency medical services, emergency repair services). It presents a unified study of functions of random variables, geometrical probability, multi-server queueing theory, spatial location theory, network analysis and graph theory, and relevant methods of simulation.

Logistics Systems - MIT

This subject is a survey of the fundamental analytic tools, approaches, and techniques which are useful in the design and operation of logistics systems and integrated supply chains. The material is taught from a managerial perspective, with an emphasis on where and how specific tools can be used to improve the overall performance and reduce the total cost of a supply chain. We place a strong emphasis on the development and use of fundamental models to illustrate the underlying concepts involved in both intra and inter-company logistics operations.

Macroeconomic Theory - MIT

Introduction to the theories of economic growth. Topics will include basic facts of economic growth and long-run economic development; brief overview of optimal control theory and dynamic programming; basic neoclassical growth model under a variety of market structures; human capital and economic growth; endogenous growth models; models with endogenous technology; models of directed technical change; competition, market structure and growth; financial and economic development; international trade and economic growth; institutions and economic development.

Macroeconomic Theory II - MIT

This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. Topics include the basic model or the consumption/saving choice, the RBC model or the labor/leisure choice, non-trivial investment decisions, two-good analysis, money, price setting, the "new Keynesian" model, monetary policy, and fiscal policy.

Macroeconomic Theory III - MIT

This course covers issues in the theory of consumption, investment and asset prices. We lay out the basic models first, and then examine the empirical facts that motivate extensions to these models.

Macroeconomics for Managers - Utah State

This course provides a broad overview of macroeconomic theory and policy. The focus is on understanding fluctuations in the levels of income, employment, and production and policy responses to these fluctuations.

Making Decisions - The Open University

Do you hate making decisions? Does the ability of others to make snap decisions really frustrate you? This unit will help you understand some of the processes involved in decision making. Attention to the psychology of decision making and the social context in which decisions are made can improve your understanding of others and yourself.

Management Accounting and Control Spring - MIT

This course examines management accounting and related analytical methodologies for decision making and control in profit-directed organizations. It also defines product costing, budgetary control systems, and performance evaluation systems for planning, coordinating, and monitoring the performance of a business. This course defines principles of measurement and develops framework for assessing behavioral dimensions of control systems; impact of different managerial styles on motivation and performance in an organization.

Management Communication for Undergraduates - MIT

This is a required seminar for Management Science majors to develop the writing, speaking, teamwork, and interpersonal communication skills necessary for managers. Students learn communication principles, strategies, and methods through discussions, exercises, examples, and cases. Assignments include writing memos and business letters, and giving oral presentations in labs outside of class. A major project is the production of a team report and presentation on a topic of interest to a managerial audience.

Management of Supply Networks for Products and Services - MIT

This course covers organizational, strategic and operational aspects of managing Supply Networks (SNs) from domestic and international perspectives. Topics include alternative SN structures, strategic alliances, design of delivery systems and the role of third party logistics providers. Many of the activities exchanged among enterprises in a SN are of a service nature, and the final output is often a combination of tangible products and services which the end-customer purchases. A series of concepts, frameworks and analytic tools are provided to better understand the management of service operations.

Managerial Economics - Utah State

This course covers the essential principles and tools of Managerial Economics, the application of microeconomics to management decisions. Students who master this material will be better prepared for leadership positions in business, not-for-profit, and government entities.

Managerial Psychology - MIT

This course introduces you to behavioral science theories, methods, and tools and provides opportunities to use and apply them to problems you will encounter in your work and career. The course material will begin with an overview of work and organizations in modern industrial society, and then examine individual behavior, move to behavior in groups or teams, and finally discuss organizations as a whole.

Managing and Volunteering in the Non Profit Sector - MIT

This is a course intended to give students a broad overview of the management challenges of the non-profit sector. It is not a detailed management course but rather is aimed at students who will likely relate to non-profits in a variety of ways (on the boards, as volunteers, as fund-raisers, and occasionally as staff).

Managing Innovation and Entrepreneurship - MIT

This course discusses the basics every manager needs to organize successful technology-driven innovation in both entrepreneurial and established firms. We start by examining innovation-based strategies as a source of competitive advantage and then examine how to build organizations that excel at identifying, building and commercializing technological innovations.

Managing Innovation: Emerging Trends - MIT

Important emerging trends in innovation are identified, and their implications for innovation management are explored. Major topics to be discussed include the trend to open information ("open source") rather than protected intellectual property; the distribution of innovation over many independent but collaborating actors; and toolkits that empower users to innovate for themselves.

Managing the Innovation Process - MIT

This course approaches "managing the innovation process" through five levels of analysis: individual, team, network, organizational, and industrial. At each level of analysis, particular attention is given to the conditions under which innovation processes succeed and fail.

Managing Transformations in Work, Organizations and Society - MIT

The course focuses on skills managers need to adapt to current sweeping changes in the nature of work and the workforce, in business organizations and their roles in society, and in the institutions that interact with work, particularly the labor market, community and family-centered groups. This year's teaching will be the basis for a workshop session at the Sloan School's 50th Anniversary Convocation.

Manufacturing System and Supply Chain Design - MIT

This course focuses on decision making for system design, as it arises in manufacturing systems and supply chains. Students are exposed to frameworks and models for structuring the key issues and trade-offs. The class presents and discusses new opportunities, issues and concepts introduced by the internet and e-commerce. It also introduces various models, methods and software tools for logistics network design, capacity planning and flexibility, make-buy, and integration with product development.

Marketing Management - MIT

This course is an introduction to marketing: the study or practice of providing goods or services that satisfy human desires. To illustrate and discuss marketing concepts, we will read articles from scientific journals, chapters from marketing textbooks, newspaper clippings, and selections from popular literature. We will also use case studies to illustrate marketing principles and to apply marketing concepts to the real world. These case studies will involve a wide variety of products, including flowers, computer software, power tools, watches, and even contact lenses for chickens (seriously).

Marketing Strategy - MIT

The course is aimed at helping students look at the entire marketing mix in light of the strategy of the firm. It is most helpful to students pursuing careers in which they need to look at the firm as a whole. Examples include consultants, investment analysts, entrepreneurs, and product managers.

Medical Products Quality Systems - University of California

Learn about the essential elements of Quality System Regulations (QSR's) and Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP's), how there is a commonality between them, and how to develop a global approach to Quality Systems in order to satisfy international requirements of ISO 9001:2000 and ISO 13485:2003. A detailed analysis of these systems and practical 'how to' recommendations and approaches are presented, with particular emphasis on the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) QSR's and GMP's.

Medieval Economic History in Comparative Perspective - MIT

This course will survey the conditions of material life and the changing social and economic relations in medieval Europe with reference to the comparative context of contemporary Islamic, Chinese, and central Asian experiences. The subject covers the emergence and decline of feudal institutions, the transformation of peasant agriculture, living standards and the course of epidemic disease, and the ebb and flow of long-distance trade across the Eurasian system.

Medium and Long Term Financing - MSU Global

Identify and arrange short-term (up to 180 days) pre- and/or post-shipment finance for a seller to ensure lowest cost financing at acceptable levels of risk.

Microeconomic Theory I - MIT

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Microeconomic Theory II - MIT

This course offers an introduction to noncooperative game theory. The course is intended both for graduate students who wish to develop a solid background in game theory in order to pursue research in the applied fields of economics and related disciplines, and for students wishing to specialize in economic theory. While the course is designed for graduate students in economics, it is open to all students who have taken and passed 14.121.

Microeconomic Theory IV - MIT

The topic of the class is information economics. The purpose is to give an introduction to some of the main subjects in this field: risk sharing, moral hazard, adverse selection (signaling, screening), mechanism design, decision making under uncertainty. These subjects (and others) will be treated in more depth in the advanced theory courses on Contract Theory.

Negotiation and Conflict Management - MIT

Negotiation and Conflict Management presents negotiation theory – strategies and styles – within an employment context. 15.667 meets only eleven times, with a different topic each week, which is why students should commit to attending all classes. In addition to the theory and exercises presented in class, students practice negotiating with role-playing simulations that cover a range of topics. Students also learn how to negotiate in difficult situations, which include abrasiveness, racism, sexism, whistle-blowing, and emergencies.

New Econometric Methods - MIT

This course focuses on recent developments in econometrics, especially structural estimation. The topics include nonseparable models, models of imperfect competition, auction models, duration models, and nonlinear panel data. Results are illustrated with economic applications.

Nonlinear Econometric Analysis - MIT

This course presents micro-econometric models, including large sample theory for estimation and hypothesis testing, generalized method of moments (GMM), estimation of censored and truncated specifications, quantile regression, structural estimation, nonparametric and semiparametric estimation, treatment effects, panel data, bootstrapping, simulation methods, and Bayesian methods. The methods are illustrated with economic applications.

Nonlinear Programming - MIT

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of nonlinear optimization theory and methods. Topics include unconstrained and constrained optimization, linear and quadratic programming, Lagrange and conic duality theory, interior-point algorithms and theory, Lagrangian relaxation, generalized programming, and semi-definite programming. Algorithmic methods used in the class include steepest descent, Newton's method, conditional gradient and subgradient optimization, interior-point methods and penalty and barrier methods.

Operations Management - MIT

This course will introduce concepts and techniques for design, planning and control of manufacturing and service operations. The course provides basic definitions of operations management terms, tools and techniques for analyzing operations, and strategic context for making operational decisions.

Operations Strategy - MIT

This course will address operations strategy by building on the concepts of: Reengineering and process design developed by Dr. Michael Hammer;Manufacturing strategy as developed in the literature, primarily by people at HBS; and Supply chain design and 3-D concurrent engineering literature as developed in Charles Fine’s book, Clockspeed: Winning Industry Control in the Age of Temporary Advantage. Perseus Books, 1999. The concepts there emphasize the necessity of integrating product strategy, manufacturing strategy, and supply chain strategy.

Optimization Methods in Management Science - MIT

This course introduces students to the theory, algorithms, and applications of optimization. Optimization methodologies include linear programming, network optimization, integer programming, decision trees, and dynamic programming. The methods have applications to logistics, manufacturing, transportation, marketing, project management, and finance.

Organizational Processes - MIT

Organizational Processes enhances students' ability to take effective action in complex organizational settings by providing the analytic tools needed to analyze, manage, and lead the organizations of the future. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the organizational context in influencing which individual styles and skills are effective. The subject centers on three complementary perspectives, or "lenses", on an organization: political, cultural, and strategic design.

Organizations and Environments - MIT

The goal of this doctoral course is to familiarize students with major conceptual frameworks, debates, and developments in contemporary organization theory. This is an inter-disciplinary domain of inquiry drawing primarily from sociology, and secondarily from economics, psychology, anthropology, and political science. The course focuses on inter-organizational processes, and also addresses the economic, institutional and cultural contexts that organizations must face.

Organizations as Enacted Systems: Learning, Knowing and Change - MIT

The course is structured around a core of fundamental concepts concerning how we view organizations, and the application of these concepts to basic domains of action crucial for contemporary businesses: sensemaking, learning, knowing, and change. We view organizations as enacted systems, wherein humans are continually shaping the structures that influence their action in turn. In other words, we create the systems that then create us.

Organizing for Innovative Product Development - MIT

This course introduces new product development. Topics include technology transfer, relations between science and technology, and the innovation process.

Patents, Copyrights and the Law of Intellectual Property - MIT

This weekly seminar examines key concepts of U.S. intellectual property law, with emphasis on patents and copyrights and a briefer look at trade secrets and trademarks. Current issues relating to information technologies and business methods will be highlighted. The seminar has no prerequisites, and is designed for both graduate students and undergraduates. Half of the seats in the seminar are reserved for students from MIT departments other than Sloan.

Payments of Goods and Services - MSU Global

Establish the most appropriate methods and terms of payment and required documentation to ensure timely payment for the sale of goods and/or services and to facilitate external financing..

Planning and Zoning - MSU Global

This online short-course contains the following units: Introducing the Planning Official, Looking Back to Look Forward,and How Does Zoning Work?.

Political and Economic Risk - MSU Global

Assess political and economic risks and cultural issues of the target country to establish the financial costs and viability..

Power and Negotiation - MIT

This course is designed to provide you with a competitive advantage in negotiation. You will learn and practice the technical skills and analytic frameworks that are necessary to negotiate successfully with peers from other top business schools, and you will learn methods for developing the powerful social capital you will need to rise in the executive ranks of any organization.

Practical Information Technology Management - MIT

The course purpose is to provide the substance and skill necessary to make sound business decisions relating to information systems and to work with senior line managers in the resolution of issues and problems in this area.

Practical Leadership - MIT

Practical Leadership is an interactive seminar where students receive repeated coaching and real-time feedback on their own leadership capabilities from their peers and the instructor. The course is structured around a set of readings. However, the key component is each student's own self-assessment.

Preparing a Project - MIT

Managing projects is something most managers will find themselves doing at some point in their career. This unit aims to provide an overview of the features of a project and the issues that arise in managing a project.

Principles and Practice of Drug Development - MIT

This course serves as a description and critical assessment of the major issues and stages of developing a pharmaceutical or biopharmaceutical. Topics covered include drug discovery, preclinical development, clinical investigation, manufacturing and regulatory issues considered for small and large molecules, and economic and financial considerations of the drug development process. A multidisciplinary perspective is provided by the faculty, who represent clinical, life, and management sciences. Various industry guests also participate.

Principles of Macroeconomics - MIT

This course is designed to introduce classic macroeconomic issues such as growth, inflation, unemployment, interest rates, exchange rates, technological progress, and budget deficits. The course will provide a unified framework to address these issues and to study the impact of different policies, such as monetary and fiscal policies, on the aggregate behavior of individuals. These analytical tools will be used to understand the recent experience of the United States and other countries and to address how current policy initiatives affect their macroeconomic performance.

Principles of Microeconomics - MIT

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms.

Product Design and Development - MIT

Product Design and Development is a project-based course that covers modern tools and methods for product design and development. The cornerstone is a project in which teams of management, engineering, and industrial design students conceive, design and prototype a physical product. Class sessions are conducted in workshop mode and employ cases and hands-on exercises to reinforce the key ideas.

Proseminar in Manufacturing - MIT

This course provides an integrative forum for operations and manufacturing students and is the focus for projects in leadership, service, and improvement. It covers a set of integrative manufacturing topics or issues such as leadership and related topics, and includes presentations by guest speakers such as senior level managers of manufacturing companies. The subject is largely managed by students.

Public Economics I - MIT

Theory and evidence on government taxation policy. Topics include tax incidence, optimal tax theory, the effect of taxation on labor supply and savings, taxation and corporate behavior, and tax expenditure policy.

Public Economics II - MIT

This course covers theory and evidence on government expenditure policy-- topics include: The theory of public goods; Education; State and local public goods; Political economy; Redistribution and welfare policy; Social insurance programs such as social security and unemployment insurance; and Health care policy.

Putting Social Science to the Test: Field Experiments in Economics - MIT

This is a new class on the topic of field (that is, 'in situ') and laboratory experiments in the social sciences - both what these experiments have taught and can teach us and how to conduct them.

Queues: Theory and Applications - MIT

This class deals with the modeling and analysis of queueing systems, with applications in communications, manufacturing, computers, call centers, service industries and transportation. Topics include birth-death processes and simple Markovian queues, networks of queues and product form networks, single and multi-server queues, multi-class queueing networks, fluid models, adversarial queueing networks, heavy-traffic theory and diffusion approximations. The course will cover state of the art results which lead to research opportunities.

Readings in Optimization - MIT

In keeping with the tradition of the last twenty-some years, the Readings in Optimization seminar will focus on an advanced topic of interest to a portion of the MIT optimization community: randomized methods for deterministic optimization. In contrast to conventional optimization algorithms whose iterates are computed and analyzed deterministically, randomized methods rely on stochastic processes and random number/vector generation as part of the algorithm and/or its analysis.

Real Estate Capital Markets - MIT

This half-semester course introduces and surveys the major public capital market real estate vehicles, REITs and MBS (with primary emphasis on CMBS). Some background is also included in basic modern portfolio theory and equilibrium asset pricing. This course is primarily designed to provide MSRED students with a basic introduction to the public capital market sources of financial capital for real estate, and how those markets value such capital investments.

Real Estate Economics - MIT

This course, offered by the MIT Center for Real Estate, focuses on developing an understanding of the macroeconomic factors that shape and influence markets for real property. We will develop the theory of land markets and locational choice. The material covered includes studies of changing economic activities, demographic trends, transportation and local government behavior as they affect real estate.

Real Estate Finance and Investment - MIT

This course is an introduction to the most fundamental concepts, principles, analytical methods and tools useful for making investment and finance decisions regarding commercial real estate assets. As the first of a two-course sequence, this course will focus on the basic building blocks and the "micro" level, which pertains to individual properties and deals.

Regulatory Requirements for Pharmaceutical Products - University of California

This course presents a detailed overview of the regulatory requirements for the development and manufacture of pharmaceutical products. Individuals involved in manufacturing, quality control, research and development, and clinical studies will learn the latest information.

Research Seminar in IT: Economic Perspectives - MIT

Business organizations and markets use a bewildering variety of structures to coordinate the productive activities of their stakeholders. Dramatic changes in information technology and the nature of economic competition are forcing firms to come up with new ways of organizing work. This course uses economic theory to investigate the roles of information and technology in the existing diversity of organizations and markets and in enabling the creating of new organizational forms.

Risk Mitigation Techniques - MSU Global

After evaluating foreign currency exchange risk, select, implement, and manage risk mitigation techniques to protect the company against fluctuation of foreign exchange.

S-Lab: Laboratory for Sustainable Business - MIT

How can we translate real-world challenges into future business opportunities? How can individuals, organizations, and society learn and undergo change at the pace needed to stave off worsening problems? Today, organizations of all kinds—traditional manufacturing firms, those that extract resources, a huge variety of new start-ups, services, non-profits, and governmental organizations of all types, among many others—are tackling these very questions.

Seminar in Operations Management - MIT

This seminar will explore the purposes and development of Technology Roadmaps for systematically mapping out possible development paths for various technological domains and the industries that build on them. Data of importance for such roadmaps include rates of innovation, key bottlenecks, physical limitations, improvement trendlines, corporate intent, and value chain and industry evolutionary paths.

Short Term Financing - MSU Global

Identify and arrange short-term (up to 180 days) pre- and/or post-shipment finance for a seller to ensure lowest cost financing at acceptable levels of risk.

Spa and Hospitality Operations - University of California

Gain an understanding of the general operational and administrative procedures in spas, private clubs and the hospitality industry. You'll develop an understanding of unique sensitivities required in managing and operating in the increasingly lucrative and complex spa industry.

Special Seminar in Applied Probability and Stochastic Processes - MIT

This seminar is intended for doctoral students and discusses topics in applied probability. This semester includes a variety of fields, namely statistical physics (local weak convergence and correlation decay), artificial intelligence (belief propagation algorithms), computer science (random K-SAT problem, coloring, average case complexity) and electrical engineering (low density parity check (LDPC) codes).

Special Seminar in Management: The Nuts and Bolts of Business Plans - MIT

The nuts and bolts of preparing a Business Plan will be explored in this 16th annual course offering. The course is open to members of the MIT Community and to others interested in entrepreneurship. It is particularly recommended for persons who are interested in starting or are involved in a new business.

Special Seminar in Marketing: Marketing Management - MIT

The purpose of this course is to introduce key marketing ideas and phenomena, develop students' skills in marketing analysis and planning and provide a forum (both written and oral) for presenting and defending recommendations and critically examining and discussing those of others. An emphasis is placed on theory and practice that draws on market research, competitive analysis, and marketing science.

Statistical Methods in Economics - MIT

The course introduces statistical theory to prepare students for the remainder of the econometrics sequence. The emphasis of the course is to understand the basic principles of statistical theory. A brief review of probability will be given; however, this material is assumed knowledge. The course also covers basic regression analysis.

Strategic HR Management - MIT

This course is about both the design and execution of human resource management strategies. This course has two central themes: (1) How to think systematically and strategically about aspects of managing the organization's human assets, and (2) What really needs to be done to implement these policies and to achieve competitive advantage. It adopts the perspective of a general manager and addresses human resource topics (including reward systems, performance management, high-performance human resource systems, training and development, recruitment, retention, equal employment opportunity laws, work-force diversity, and union-management relationships) from a strategic perspective.

Strategic Management I - MIT

This course focuses on some of the important current issues in strategic management. It will concentrate on modern analytical approaches and on enduring successful strategic practices. It is consciously designed with a technological and global outlook since this orientation in many ways highlights the significant emerging trends in strategic management. The course is intended to provide the students with a pragmatic approach that will guide the formulation and implementation of corporate, business, and functional strategies.

Strategic Management II - MIT

This course is intended to be an extension of course 15.902, Strategic Management I, with the purpose of allowing the students to experience an in-depth application of the concepts and frameworks of strategic management. Throughout the course, Prof. Arnoldo Hax will discuss the appropriate methodologies, concepts, and tools pertinent to strategic analyses and will illustrate their use by discussing many applications in real-life settings, drawn from his own personal experiences.

Strategic Marketing Measurement - MIT

The course will teach you how to write, conduct and analyze a marketing research survey. The emphasis will be on discovering market structure and segmentation, but you can pursue other project applications.A major objective of the course is to give you some "hands-on" exposure to analysis techniques that are widely used in consulting and marketing research factor analysis, perceptual mapping, conjoint, and cluster analysis). These techniques used to be considered advanced but now involve just a few keystrokes on most stat software packages.

Systems Dynamics for Business Policy - MIT

This course provides an introduction to system dynamics modeling for the analysis of business policy and strategy. Students learn to visualize a business organization in terms of the structures and policies that create dynamics and regulate performance. The course uses role playing games, simulation models, and management flight simulators to develop principles for the successful management of complex strategies. Special emphasis will be placed on case studies of successful strategies using system dynamics.

System Dynamics Self Study - MIT

Many books and thousands of papers cover the field of system dynamics. With all of these resources available, it can be difficult to know where to begin. The System Dynamics in Education Project at MIT put together these resources to help people sort through the vast library of books and papers on system dynamics. This course site includes a collection of papers and computer exercises entitled “Road Maps,” as well as a collection of assignments and solutions that were initially part of a guided study to system dynamics.

System Optimization and Analysis for Manufacturing - MIT

One objective of this course is to introduce modeling, optimization and simulation, as it applies to the study and analysis of manufacturing systems for decision support. The introduction of optimization models and algorithms provide a framework to think about a wide range of issues that arise in manufacturing systems. The second objective is to expose students to a wide range of applications for these methods and models, and to integrate this material with their introduction to operations management.

Systems Optimization - MIT

Managers and engineers are constantly attempting to optimize, particularly in the design and operation of complex systems. This course is an application-oriented introduction to (systems) optimization.

Systems Optimization: Models and Computation - MIT

This class is an applications-oriented course covering the modeling of large-scale systems in decision-making domains and the optimization of such systems using state-of-the-art optimization tools. Application domains include: transportation and logistics planning, pattern classification and image processing, data mining, design of structures, scheduling in large systems, supply-chain management, financial engineering, and telecommunications systems planning. Modeling tools and techniques include linear, network, discrete and nonlinear optimization, heuristic methods, sensitivity and post-optimality analysis, decomposition methods for large-scale systems, and stochastic optimization.

Taxes and Business Strategy - MIT

Traditional finance and other business courses analyze a broad spectrum of factors affecting business decision-making but typically give little systematic consideration to the role of taxes. In contrast, traditional tax accounting courses concentrate on administrative issues while ignoring the richness of the context in which tax factors operate. The objective of the course is to bridge this gap by providing a framework for recognizing tax planning opportunities and applying basic principles of tax strategy.

Team Project - MIT

The Team Project has the goals of (1) developing teamwork and leadership skills and (2) learning from the analysis of a change initiative in a real-world company using concepts from other core courses. This class has no regular class schedule or weekly readings. Almost everything is oriented around your team and your project, with only a few deadlines. Each team is responsible for analyzing a recent, ongoing, or anticipated initiative at a real company.

Technology Strategy - MIT

This course provides a series of strategic frameworks for managing high-technology businesses. The emphasis throughout the course is on the development and application of conceptual models which clarify the interactions between competition, patterns of technological and market change, and the structure and development of organizational capabilities.

The Financial Markets Context - The Open University

How do financial markets match providers with users, and how efficiently does the market determine prices? Can investors rely on notoriously volatile stock markets to function efficiently? It can be difficult to determine whether successful investments are a matter of skill and luck. In this unit, you will interrogate whether markets can function efficiently, and what factors might militate against this. You will also learn the importance of the Efficient Markets Hypothesis.

The Law of Corporate Finance and Financial Markets - MIT

Much of this course focuses on mergers and acquisitions (M&A), and the law-sensitive aspects of financial services and financial markets. The course is designed to be an introduction to business law that covers the fundamentals, including contracts, liability, regulation, employment, and corporations. This class also provides an in-depth treatment of the law of finance.

The Law of Mergers and Acquisitions - MIT

This course is designed to give students an introduction to the law-sensitive aspects of Mergers & Acquisitions (M&A). In Module I, we examine the legal implications of key roles and deal structures, and walk through some of the issues that would typically arise in a simple and friendly transaction. We also give a class to the legal issues arising in LBOs and the legal concerns of financial sponsors more generally, and another class to employment-related issues, including those relating to managers facing unsettled circumstances.

The Life Science Industry: An Introduction - The Open University

This unit covers the emergence of the Life Sciences sector out of its precursor the pharmaceutical industry. After examining some historical perspectives it uses case studies to look at developments in the science, business and, primarily, management strategies used in Life Sciences. It also briefly considers Life Sciences' place in the wider story of health provision. This introductory unit will be of interest to managers in the Life Sciences sector and to the general reader.

The Market Led Organization - The Open University

Marketing means different things to different people. How do you decide who to aim a campaign at? If you already have a background in marketing, this unit will improve your understanding of market orientation and (going to market). It also assesses the importance of managing key internal and external relationships.

The Public Policy: Action Relationship - The Open University

Much literature on the public policy process focusses narrowly on the policy-making part. This unit widens the focus to examine the implementation phase, and how change happens as a result of new policies: that is, policy – action relationship. It does this by looking at four different models of how this relationship can work through examples from varying fields. The unit will be of interest to public sector managers, their staff and the general reader.

The Sociology of Strategy - MIT

This seminar provides an introduction to scholarship in a growing research community: the sociologists and sociologically-inclined organization theorists who study issues that relate, at least in a broad sense, to the interdisciplinary field of inquiry that is known as "strategy" or "strategic management" research. The course is not designed to survey the field of strategy. Rather, the focus is on getting a closer understanding of the recent work by sociologists and sociologically-oriented organization theorists that investigates central questions in strategic management.

The Software Business - MIT

This subject is a seminar-style course aimed at anyone who is interested in founding a software company or working for a software company or company that uses software technology extensively as a senior manager, developer, or product/program manager. It is also appropriate for people interested in the industry or in working as an industry analyst. Many of the issues we discuss are highly relevant for companies whose businesses are heavily dependent on software, such as in e-business or financial services, or embedded software for industrial applications.

The Theory of Operations Management - MIT

The doctoral seminar focuses on theoretical work for studying operations planning and control problems. This term's special topic, "Customer-Driven Operations," considers how a number of companies have succeeded in focusing their operation systems on the customer. The class reviews the quantitative models and theoretical tools underlying some of the customer-driven operational practices of these cutting-edge companies. Students will read and present research papers on topics such as distribution systems, short life-cycle product management, and forecast evolution models.

Time Series Analysis - MIT

The course provides a survey of the theory and application of time series methods in econometrics. Topics covered will include univariate stationary and non-stationary models, vector autoregressions, frequency domain methods, models for estimation and inference in persistent time series, and structural breaks. We will cover different methods of estimation and inferences of modern dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models (DSGE): simulated method of moments, maximum likelihood and Bayesian approach. The empirical applications in the course will be drawn primarily from macroeconomics.

Topics in Game Theory - MIT

This course is an advanced topics course on market and mechanism design. We will study existing or new market institutions, understand their properties, and think about whether they can be re-engineered or improved. Topics discussed include mechanism design, auction theory, one-sided matching in house allocation, two-sided matching, stochastic matching mechanisms, student assignment, and school choice.

Training and Human Resources Development - University of California

Acquire the information and experience you need to identify your organization's training and development needs and master the processes necessary to develop, implement and evaluate effective training programs. You will gain an understanding of your role and responsibilities as a trainer, as well as the practical hands- on knowledge needed to implement a successful program through lectures, classroom discussions, and developing and presenting an actual training session in class.

Understanding Operations Management - The Open University

Operations management is one of the central functions of all organisations whether producing goods or services, or in the private, public or voluntary sectors. This unit will provide you with a basic framework for understanding this function and discusses the role of operations managers, in particular the importance of focusing on suppliers and customers.

Urban Labor Markets and Employment Policy - MIT

This subject discusses the broader trends in the labor market, how urban labor markets function, public and private training policy, other labor market programs, the link between labor market policy and economic development, and the organization of work within firms.

White Collar and Corporate Crime - University of California

Examines criminal activity within the professions, organizations, and businesses. Theories discussing the etiology of these acts are considered as well as perspectives regarding their control.

Work, Employment and Industrial Relations Theory - MIT

This seminar will cover the multi-disciplinary theoretical and empirical foundations of research on work, employment, labor markets, and industrial relations. We begin by tracing the historical development of theory and research in the field, paying special attention to how the normative premises, concepts, and methodological traditions of industrial relations compare to those of other disciplines that contribute to the study of work and employment relations. Then we will review a number of current theoretical and policy debates shaping the field.

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